Doodle tools needed.

I’ve never been able to draw in a sketchbook, I just find it too confining for my creative tastes. I prefer drawing in notepads, the kind you can simply tear out a sheet guilt-free and tack to a wall or place inside a project folder etc. Because I use notepads I’m left with a thin cardboard backing once I draw through all the pages.

I’ve always thought it was a waste to just toss these cardboard sheets away so I started saving them. I wasn’t exactly sure what I’d end up doing with them but so far they’ve led to what I call cardboard doodles. It’s more like a creative exercise for me and a good excuse to draw. I also like the fact the cardboard isn’t being tossed in the trash and becomes fun art.

All you need to do you own cardboard doodle is shown in the photo above. And this post shows how I created my most recent cardboard doodle “Angelic Pooch.”

Drawing out a rough doodle profile.

Sometimes I just immediately start cutting out a shape, but most often I rough out a very crude profile with my pencil. In this case it’s a dog with wings.

Cutting out my cardboard doodle.

Cutting out the cardboard doodle is easiest with a good pair of scissors. On some smaller details I may use an xacto knife to work out the final profile.

Final cardboard cut-out done.

For this cardboard doodle I used nothing but my scissors to cut it out.

Blackening the edges.

The first thing I do before I start doodling is to black the edge of the cardboard cut-out so it doesn’t show the raw cardboard color. This just helps the aesthetic of the final cardboard doodle.

Cardboard doodling begins.

Using a PaperMate flair pen I begin doodling on one side the cardboard cut-out. In this case I flipped the cardboard so it faced left to right and drew out my dog doodle roughly.

Final doodling.

Using a PaperMate flair pen I begin doodling on one side the cardboard cut-out. In this case I flipped the cardboard so it faced left to right and drew out my dog doodle roughly.

Final “Angelic Pooch” cardboard doodle.

I usually draw in most of the details with my PaperMate flair pen than fill in larger areas with the sharpie. I rarely color these cardboard doodles, I just like the simple black and white feel of them and the raw textured cardboard paper.

“Angelic Pooch” cardboard doodle.

Re-purposing waste paper like this is fun, and I now have a drawer full of cardboard waiting to be turned into artwork. My “Angelic Pooch” cardboard doodle now flies free around my studio. If you’d like to download another cardboard doodle in the form of a free tutorial called “Doodle Dog” you can find it here.


Keywords: Drawing, Doodling, Creativity, Commentary, Green